Burry Holms

At the northern end of Rhossili Bay is Burry Holms, a small tidal island that is accessible approximately 2.5 hours after high tide.  This was my fathers favourite fishing spot and where he would spend far too many hours spinning for bass off the north point. The island  is a 20 minute walk from Broughton Caravan Park or a 30 minute walk from Hillend Caravan Park. 

 
stonellang.jpg
 Photography © Chris Gill Jones 2016

Photography © Chris Gill Jones 2016

 

Standing on top of the island  and on a clear day, you can see Caldey Island to the West.  Turning towards the north-east there is the Whiteford Lighthouse and past this is Burry Port harbour. The island was once inhabited during the Mesolithic period. These days there are only rabbits, but be careful, as it is easy to lose your footing in a rabbit hole. During the Iron age, Bury Holms was a hill fort and later a Medieval monastery.  The flora on the island includes thrift and sea campion.  Seals can often be seen in the waters close by.

Burry Holms is also popular with surfers because under the right conditions, wave swells reflect off the the island and form a Peak, hence the name.
Dogs are welcome on the beach all year round.
The RAF use Pendine, on the opposite Carmarthenshire coast, to practice and very often fighter planes that can be clearly seen and heard as they fly past the island.

 
 
 
  Cormorant

Cormorant

A large waterbird, the cormorant has a long neck making it appear reptilian. It is often seen standing with its wings held out to dry. Cormorants are supreme fishers which can bring them into conflict with anglers. These are common along the south coast of Gower and around Burry Holms

 

Photography © Chris Gill Jones 2016

 

Winter swell at Peaks, adjacent to Burry Holms